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A Chorus of Critical Praise for Gene Clark's 'No Other'

Reissue Earns Missouri-born Songwriter Recognition He Never Got in Life

The reissue of Gene Clark’s “No Other” album has inspired an outpouring of critical praise for the late Missouri-born singer and songwriter, who is featured in a profile now appearing on Flatland.

Resurrecting Gene Clark's Recording Legacy

The career-making moment Gene Clark was waiting for in 1974 may now - 45 years later and long after his death - finally be arriving. The singer and composer grew up in the Kansas City area before leaving in 1963 to become a co-founder of the landmark rock group, the Byrds.

The career-making moment Gene Clark was waiting for in 1974 may now - 45 years later and long after his death - finally be arriving. The singer and composer grew up in the Kansas City area before leaving in 1963 to become a co-founder of the landmark rock group, the Byrds.

The career-making moment Gene Clark was waiting for in 1974 may now - 45 years later and long after his death - finally be arriving. The singer and composer grew up in the Kansas City area before leaving in 1963 to become a co-founder of the landmark rock group, the Byrds.

Here is a sampling of recent reviews of the “No Other” reissue:

“It is simply one of the most beautiful records ever made and anyone who hasn’t experienced it needs to stop reading and do so immediately. But for those of us who have, while they have already heard the best possible version of ‘No Other’ (as we tend to learn from all box sets of this ilk, the best version got released), in these newly-discovered versions there is much to learn about and love.” - Mike Goldsmith, Record Collector

“For the fanatic, there is nothing quite like this sound-bath and its accompanying eye candy. If the full monty is out of reach price-wise for the Clark aficionado, the two-CD hardbound edition, which includes nine of the alternates, is a magnificent alternative, containing generous excerpts from the box’s book. Even if you choose the least expensive option of the basic LP or single CD, you are in for a revelation if you have never heard ‘No Other.’ As its title suggests, it remains a one-of-a-kind listening experience.” - Chris Morris, Variety

“Tragically ignored during its time, the album takes its rightful place it alongside Love’s ‘Forever Changes,’ Judee Sill’s ‘Heart Food,’ or Van Morrison’s ‘Astral Weeks,’ bringing together the conflicted, clashing aspects of Gene Clark’s art into a cohesive whole.” - Andy Beta, Pitchfork

“The new version has been remastered from the original tapes, and the results are spectacular... Clark rightly considered it his masterwork, and decades later, this reissue has reaffirmed his belief. A seamless blend of American music — twangy guitars, a rhythm section that taps out dynamic funk and soul patterns, an understated mix of piano, synth and keyboards and lots of backing singers — it connects genres and movements with ease.” - Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times

“It's these (early takes of) stripped-down performances that hint at what this album could have been, without the expansive and expensive production... If you've listened to Steve Earle, the Jayhawks, and Wilco recently, you'll be ready for it. The world might finally catch up with Gene Clark – it only took 45 years.” - Ian Rushbury, PopMatters

“A fresh listen to ‘No Other,’ Clark’s lone Asylum album, reminds you both of its beauty and its occasional more frustrating aspects. The songs, which stretch out to as long as eight minutes, aren’t played as much as unfurled... Shorn of the choir that appears on many of its songs, the outtakes are vital for the way they allow us to zero in on Clark’s singing. It’s easy to forget how robust a vocalist Clark could be.” - David Browne, Rolling Stone

Here's a Gene Clark sampler, compiled by writer Brian Burnes: